Make Like A Ship

I thought you might find author Jacci Gooding’s thoughts on my book launch at Warwick Books interesting.

Jacci Gooding, Author

One of the great things it has to be said about self-publishing is that you get to meet lots of new and inspiring authors. All those writers, myself included, who would sit in glorious isolation bashing away at our keyboards whenever we got the chance can now get our selves out there and meet up with other like-minded people and suddenly it’s not such a lonely profession after all. It’s very reassuring to hear of others’ highs and lows, of how they came to create the characters they did, how long it took them to reach that final edit, why they chose the cover they did – and one of the best ways to do all this is to mix and mingle at a book launch. But why launch a book, I hear you ask? Isn’t it enough just to get it all together and press print? Er, no. Your…

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Thank you!

Thank you to everyone who came to my book launch of Tragedy at Bawley Bay at Warwick Books – it means a lot to me.

Thanks too to Mog and Pauline of Warwick Books for hosting such an enjoyable and memorable evening.

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Synopsis of Tragedy at Bawley Bay

Christmas Day morning 1866: Jane Waterford waits to be removed to the City of London Lunatic Asylum. Days earlier, a mysterious woman had arrived in Jane’s home town on the River Thames, unnerving Jane’s lover, the melancholy Kathryn Lawton. Amidst her own rising terror and growing fears for Kathryn’s safety, Jane is desperate to discover the stranger’s identity. What is her claim on Kathryn and how is she connected to a tragic accident at Bawley Bay fifty years earlier? As Jane becomes increasingly alarmed that the calamity will be repeated, she is ensnared by a crime that will change her life forever.

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Beyond the Novella

Welcome!

In these ‘Beyond the Novella’ blogs I shall be describing how the setting of Tragedy at Bawley Bay was inspired by the history of Gravesend in the nineteenth-century and by its location on the River Thames. I will also write about the novella’s literary connections and how it draws upon both lesbian and women’s history.

I hope you enjoy reading the blog.

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